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United Kingdom: Edinburgh and the Scottish Highlands

Find Scotland's magic, a you explore Edinburgh, tour castles, palaces and villages, lost in time, enjoy the rugged beauty of the Highlands, and learn about the legacy of its clans. Discover the mysterious prehistoric sites in the Orkney Islands, take and easy hike in the historic Glencoe, cruise on Loch Ness, ride the Jacobite Steam Train and enjoy a full-day excursion of the evocative Isle of Skye. Stay at a lovingly restored manor house and then in a small hotel on the water's edge of Loch Linne. Enjoy freshly shucked oysters, the Aberdeen Angus beef, the smoked salmon from Dumfries & Galloway, and the peerless malt whiskies.

Scottish Castles

From magnificent city landmarks to mysterious ruins, Scotland is renowned for its iconic castles. Whether you are looking to explore the largest in the country, follow a regional trail or seek out those hidden gems, there is plenty of history to uncover as each castle has a fascinating tale to tell. Castles arrived in Scotland with the introduction of feudalism in the twelfth century. Initially these were wooden motte-and-bailey constructions, but many were replaced by stone castles with a high curtain wall. During the Wars of Independence, Robert the Bruce pursued a policy of castle slighting. In the late Middle Ages new castles were built, some on a grander scale as "livery and maintenance" castles that could support a large garrison. Gunpowder weaponry led to the use of gun ports, platforms to mount guns and walls adapted to resist bombardment. Read more...

Scottish Whiskies

Initially Whisky, the name of which evolved from uisge beatha, was lauded for its medicinal qualities, being prescribed for the preservation of health, the prolongation of life, and for the relief of colic, palsy and even smallpox. It became an intrinsic part of Scottish life - a reviver and stimulant during the long, cold winters, and a feature of social life, a welcome to be offered to guests upon arrival at their destinations. Read more...

Ancient Highland Dress

Tartan is a pattern consisting of criss-crossed horizontal and vertical bands in multiple colours. Tartans originated in woven wool, but now they are made in many other materials. Tartan is particularly associated with Scotland. Scottish kilts almost always have tartan patterns. Tartan is often called plaid in North America, but in Scotland, a plaid is a tartan cloth slung over the shoulder as a kilt accessory, or a plain ordinary blanket such as one would have on a bed. Read more...

The Scottish Glens

Carved by glacial erosion during the last Ice Age and steeped in history, Scotland’s breathtaking and stunning glens are unique and inspiring places which have remained unchanged for thousands of years. No adventure into the Scottish glens would be complete without a visit to the Great Glen, a giant geological fracture which cuts across the Highlands from Inverness, on the Moray Firth to Fort William, at the head of Loch Linnhe. The Great Glen Way is a popular route along an ancient fault line that should take you around four to seven days, passing a series of long, interconnected lochs which nestle in the shadow of Britain’s highest mountain, Ben Nevis, at 4,409. Read more...

Scottish Lochs & Rivers

There are more than 30,000 freshwater lochs (or "lakes") in Scotland. The five largest lochs in Scotland, Awe, Lomond, Morar, Ness and Shiel, hold about a third of all the water held in lochs in Scotland. Although Loch Lomond has the largest surface area and Loch Morar the greatest depth, the largest loch by volume is Loch Ness, which contains more water than all the lakes in England and Wales together. Loch Lomond is a freshwater loch lying on the Highland Boundary Fault, often considered the boundary between the lowlands of Central Scotland and the Highlands. Loch Lomond is one of Scotland's premier boating and watersports venues and the scenery draws people from all over Scotland and beyond. The loch is open to every kind of watercraft including kayaks, canoes, wind-surfers, jetskis, speedboats and cruisers and they are all very well represented. Loch Lomond Rescue Boat provides 24-hour safety cover on the loch. Read more...

DATES & COST 

August 26 - September 5, 2019
11 Days / 10 Nights 

Tour starts in Edinburgh and ends in Glasgow

$4,380 per person/ double occupancy
$1,160 optional single supplement
$380 additional night (single or double), includes airport transfer
Includes all fees and taxes

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240-750-0597 when calling from outside the US 
 
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